Marijuana Use is Associated With Reduced Risk Of Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis, Says Study

Regular consumers of alcohol  who also use cannabis are at less risk for either acute or chronic pancreatitis as compared to those who do not use the substance, according to a study published in the journal Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research.

A team of investigators from the United States and Canada assessed the prevalence of alcohol-induced pancreatitis in a nationwide sample of heavy alcohol users. They reported that those subjects who concomitantly used cannabis possessed a significantly lower risk of pancreatitis as compared to those who did not.

“Our findings suggest a reduced incidence of only alcohol-associated pancreatitis with cannabis use,” authors concluded.

Separate research by the team previously reported that “risky alcohol drinking combined with cannabis use is associated with reduced prevalence of alcohol-associated gastritis in patients.” Alcoholic gastritis refers to inflammation or erosion of the stomach lining that is caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

The full text of the study, titled “Reduced risk of alcohol-induced pancreatitis with cannabis use,” appears in Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research.

Emily Watkins is a PhD student majoring in public policy. Emily has been a freelance editor for numerous websites, and has spent hundreds of hours volunteering to help legalize marijuana. She currently resides in Los Angeles, and can be reached at Watkins.MarijuanaHerald@Gmail.com.

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